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Centre for Automotive Safety Research
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA
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Publication Details

TitleA survey of drivers' child restraint choice and knowledge in South Australia
AuthorsEdwards SA, Anderson RWG, Hutchinson TP
Year2006
TypeReport
AbstractThis study investigated the frequency of child restraint choices in a sample consisting of 357 drivers in the Adelaide metropolitan area, who were transporting to school 586 children aged up to 10 years. The main survey result was that the rate of appropriate restraint was between 64% and 72% on such trips, (according to weight criteria in the Australian and New Zealand Standard on child restraints for motor vehicles). Only 1% are completely unrestrained. Most of those who were not restrained appropriately had prematurely progressed to an adult seatbelt. Appropriate child restraint use is lowest for children in the age range 5 - <7. Inappropriate restraint choice is strongly related to the child’s age, their seating location (children seated in the rear being more likely to be restrained appropriately), and possibly the child’s entry into primary school. Female drivers were more likely than male drivers to know what restraints were suitable for children in their carriage. However, it did not appear to be the case than good knowledge of child restraints is predictive of appropriate restraint use. Barriers to booster seat use included the child’s attitudes to using a booster seat. This effect may be lessened if the child’s age were able to used to guide restraint selection, as peer cues (for child and parent) would be more consistent. Drivers almost never mentioned cost as a barrier to child restraint use. Encouraging parents to become better informed may also help, but recommendations should be reviewed. Further development of the Australian and New Zealand Standard for child restraints may enable age to be used as a criterion, thus simplifying advice to parents.
Report NumberCASR012
PublisherCentre for Automotive Safety Research
Publisher CityAdelaide
SponsorDepartment for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (SA)
ISBN1920947116
ISSN1449-2237
Page Count44

Reference
Edwards SA, Anderson RWG, Hutchinson TP (2006) A survey of drivers' child restraint choice and knowledge in South Australia (CASR012), Centre for Automotive Safety Research, Adelaide.


Files Available for Download
CASR012.pdfReport in PDF format as published