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THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
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Publication Details

TitleDemographic characteristics, drinking patterns and drink driving behaviour of injured male drivers and motorcycle riders
AuthorsHolubowycz OT, McLean AJ
Year1995
TypeJournal Article
AbstractObjective: The demographic characteristics, usual drinking and drink-driving patterns, incidence of problem drinking, pre-crash drinking behavior and attitudes towards drink-driving of crash involved male drivers and riders are described and related to blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on admission to hospital. A better understanding of these issues will enable drink-driving countermeasures to target more specifically those individuals who are most at risk of being killed or injured in alcohol-related road crashes. Method: Between June 1985 and April 1987 interviews were conducted with a sample of 302 male drivers and motorcycle riders admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia. Results: With one exception, the likelihood of having a high BAC (i.e., 80 mg/dl or above) did not differ with demographic profile. As BAC increased, there was a significant increase in: various indices of quantity and frequency of drinking; beer being the preferred beverage; percentages drinking alone, in a hotel, in a vehicle and for various less socially acceptable reasons; frequency of drink driving; likelihood of previous drink-driving suspension; and, more liberal attitudes towards drink-driving. About 25% of those with a BAC of at least 150 mg/dl were probably experiencing alcohol-related problems prior to the crash, compared with only a very small proportion of those with lower BACs. Precrash drinking most commonly involved drinking in a hotel, drinking with friends and drinking beer, with no significant differences between BAC groups. Conclusions: The results suggest that usual drinking and drink-driving patterns, as well as attitudes to drink driving, become more extreme as the BAC of male crash-involved drivers and riders increases.
Journal TitleJournal of Studies on Alcohol
Journal Volume (Issue)56(5)
Page Range513-521
Page Count10
NotesAvailable from CASR library on request

Reference
Holubowycz OT, McLean AJ (1995) 'Demographic characteristics, drinking patterns and drink driving behaviour of injured male drivers and motorcycle riders', Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 56(5), pp 513-521.